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Never Argue with a Dead Person

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To Be Forewarned Is To Be Forearmed

 
To Be Forewarned Is To Be Forearmed
 
One of the hardest things I had to learn to do as a psychic medium is to deliver bad news. However, when people come to me for a reading, I always ask them if they want to know everything. I only can read people who say yes because I have to be honest with people when I deliver a reading. Otherwise, there is no point in giving a reading. It would be like someone saying, "I want to date you, but only if we never fight." However, I hold the firm belief that "bad" things don't come through in a reading. Yes, negative information comes through. And yes, sometimes it's scary to hear your loved one is going to have a health problem or your year is going to be wrought with financial havoc. But to hear these messages in the context of a reading can allow opportunity for preparation and emotional development. 
 
"Bad news" is part of life. Each setback actually offers a great opportunity for growth and development. A layoff from work offers the opportunity to find a better job; a break-up allows you the ability to find peace and solace in your singleness; a health diagnosis may provide you with the dose of reality needed to focus on your health. 
 
Here are three easy steps to turn bad news into a learning experience. 
 
First, don't panic… If you get bad news about something, most of us go into emotional overdrive mode---cry, scream, frantic emotional eating. Instead of emotionally overloading yourself, try to distract yourself from the situation. It's better to distract yourself from the situation for a bit and return to it later. Take a trip, a walk, call a friend and talk about something ELSE. 
 
Return to the problem later... After you've had some time, analyze the cause and consequences of the situation. In order to really understand the "bad news", it's best to focus on the past, present, and future of the situation. 
 
For the past, ask yourself: "What did I do to cause this situation and what could I have done to prevent this situation?" 
 
For the current, ask yourself: "What can I do to fix this situation? What are my goals now that I am in this situation?"
 
For the future, ask yourself: "How do I want this situation to resolve? What is my highest good and highest potential in this situation?" 
 
Once you've done some analytical work around the bad news… Start putting your thoughts into action. Take steps each day to rectify the situation, and be consistent and mindful of what needs to happen in order to fix the situation. 
 
So the next time you get bad news--in life or otherwise--don't think of it as a setback. Instead, ask yourself, "What great lesson am I to learn here?"  
 
And remember: God never gives us more than we can handle. 
 
Good things,

 
Thomas John